17 November 2009

G20 Humanitarian Priorities

The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies asked the governments of the G20 about their top humanitarian priorities (PDF), results shown in the figure above.
As an initial question, the governments were asked: “What does your government consider to be the three greatest ‘humanitarian’ challenges facing the international community?"
The leading priority was "climate change." Poverty and food security did not even make the top 3 on the list. As these are "humanitarian challenges," I wonder how responding to climate change differs from responding to the other issues on the list.

7 comments:

Brian said...

Roger:
"I wonder how responding to climate change differs from responding to the other issues on the list."
Appears respondents were more focused on mitigation and the then anticipated Copenhagen Conference. The other issues appear as adaption concerns.

Roger Pielke, Jr. said...

-1-Perhaps, but I sure hope not. Mitigation is important for sure, but I don't think that anyone wants humanitarian policies to be focused on energy policies. Mitigation and adaptation are not trade-offs (as suggested by the graph above) but complements. Mitigation has no place in a portfolio of humanitarian policies such as focused on food security.

PaulM said...

Shows how out of touch the governments are with their voters, who consistently rate climate change way down the list I think.

SBVOR said...

The overwhelming majority of politicians may be indescribably corrupt and evil, but they are not entirely stupid. They know a great opportunity for a power grab (pun intended) when they see one.

Paul Biggs said...

All this demonstrates is that our ungifted amateur leaders continually bypass the democratic process back home. About time we had a democratic vote on taxpayers' money being wasted on Canutian climate control.

eric144 said...

Everyone wants on board the great Co2 gravy train, not just the climate science industry. There are a very large number of individuals in the professional classes who's mortgage is paid for by this scam.

Reading the Guardian environmental pages reveals who they are.

Dano said...

Maybe these folk think food security is not a global issue. Maybe these folk think poverty reduction is not a global issue. Maybe these folk think food security is not a global issue. Maybe these folk have been receiving dozens of staff briefings on the top issues.

Who knows? How can we influence policy with such little information?

Best,

D

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